The Monument

The Monument to the Great Fire of London was built between 1671 and 1677 to commemorate the victims of the Fire and celebrate the reconstruction of the city.

A symbol of destruction and restoration

The Monument is a Doric column made of stone standing 202 ft (62 m) tall crowned with a gilded urn of fire, representing the Great Fire of London of 1666. Its height matches the distance between where the column is and Thomas Farynor’s bakery, where the fire started.

At the base of the Monument, you’ll see a bas-relief that represents the beginning of the fire, the destruction of London and its prior restoration and construction of The Monument.

By climbing a narrow winding staircase of 311 steps, you will reach the top of The Monument and enjoy a view of the Tower Bridge area.

Better from outside

The Monument commemorates one of the saddest events that took place in London and the visit to see the column is worthwhile, although we recommend not climbing the 311 steps, as the views leave a great deal to be desired. If you decide to reach the top of The Monument, at the end of your visit you will be given a document to certify your visit.

Another interesting monument that commemorates the Great Fire of London is the “Golden Boy of Pye Corner”, located on the corner of Giltspur Street and Cock Lane in Smithville. It marks the spot where the fire was extinguished.

Schedule

April – September: 9:30am - 6:00pm (last admission 5:30pm)
October – March: 9:30am – 5:30pm (last admission 5:00pm)
The Monument is closed from 24 – 26 December.

Price

Adults: £4.50
Children (5-15 years old): £2.30
Students and Seniors: £3
The Monument + Tower Bridge: £11. (Students: £7.50)
Free entry with the London Pass.

Transport

Tube: Monument (District and Circle lines), London Bridge (Northern and Jubilee lines)
Buses: 17, 521, 21, 43, 133, 141, 48 and 149.
Train: Fenchurch Street or Tower Gateway.

Nearby places

HMS Belfast (521 m)
The Old Operating Theatre (614 m)
The Shard (629 m)
Tower of London (715 m)
London City Hall (764 m)